top of page

A Widow's Tale-How Trends Lead to the Death of Fashion


Left to right: Coat, belt & shoes - Vintage. Veil, pearls, shoes & black dress - vintage, stockings - Calzedonia.

In recent years, we witnessed significant shifts in the fashion scene. Trends began racing against each other and the world, fueled by the relentless social media platforms TikTok and Instagram, driven by an army of influencers. This rapid pace of constant renewal and change has pushed the situation into a state of absurdism, where simultaneously everything and nothing is trending. This phenomenon marked the death of fashion in its original form—a story poignantly captured in our editorial shoot at the Maison de Chateaubriand.


Our narrative follows a widow grieving her husband’s demise, left alone in her lavish mansion. In her solitude, a friend comes to her aid, luring her into a state of madness and despair. As a form of catharsis, the two venture into a frenzy, losing themselves in the mansion's luxurious decor. Over time, purged by their madness, they return to peace and innocence. Draped in white gowns, with loose hair and bare faces, they rediscover their puerile roots and find serenity in their true human nature.


Left to right: Coat, belt & shoes - Vintage. Veil, pearls, shoes & black dress - vintage, stockings - Calzedonia.

This narrative mirrors the state of the fashion scene over recent years. No one was spared when fast fashion and micro-trends flooded our feeds. Trends that used to last several years were replaced by a relentless demand for novelty, met by fast fashion brands. This daily influx of new trends led to the rise of “micro-trends,” with certain accessories or clothing pieces enjoying a brief moment in the spotlight before being deemed "cheugy" (a term describing items considered too last season and unwearable). 


Veil, pearls, shoes & black dress - vintage, stockings - Calzedonia.


We have reached a point where everything and nothing is trendy simultaneously, as consumers struggle to keep up with the constant flow of new designs. Fast fashion's influence even tainted high fashion. For instance, Diesel, under Glenn Martens' creative direction, saw a sudden rise and fall as its runway moments took social media by storm but quickly faded from the spotlight. Other brands experienced similar fates, their pieces treated like fast fashion, lasting no more than a season at the top of the trends.


Fashion had reached a state of absurdism, driven by algorithms rather than the art of “savoir-faire.” Fashion as we knew it had died.

Coat, belt & shoes - Vintage.

Coat, belt & shoes - Vintage


However, as this frenetic state has settled, we've begun to witness a fresh perspective. Appreciation for craftsmanship, innovation, and exclusivity has made a comeback. A collective mobilization toward conscious consumption encourages investing in quality pieces that stand the test of time, sparing the labor of underpaid workers, such as the Ouïghurs, and mitigating environmental impact. Fashion seems to be retreating from social media, turning towards privacy and exclusivity. For instance, The Row, led by the private Olsen twins, rarely showcases its clothes on Instagram, focusing instead on the inspirations behind the pieces. Their shows are held privately and off social media, yet their name remains on everyone's lips. Coperni has been experimenting with new mediums, presenting innovative works such as the air swipe bag and the famous spray-on dress. And we still expect plenty other artists to surprise us...


Fashion appears to have returned to a less tumultuous pace, rooting itself in passion, mindfulness and care in the creative process.



 Fashion editorial Complete metalic look - Barbara Bui
Left to right: Couture, white lace gloves & long white dress - vintage. Off-White suit - Barbara Bui, Off-White shirt with jabot, pearl necklace - vintage. White hat - Christian Dior

Left to right: Couture, white lace gloves & long white dress - vintage. Off-White suit - Barbara Bui, Off-White shirt with jabot, pearl necklace - vintage. White hat - Christian Dior


A warm and special thank you to Département des Hauts-de-Seine / Domaine départemental de la Vallée-aux-Loups – Maison de Chateaubriand, for allowing us to organise our shoot on their property. 

The Maison de Chateaubriand is open to the public for visitors, their platforms include:


Our Photographers: French Cowboy, with Mia Macfarlane and Julien Crouigneau (@french_cowboy)

Clothes: Barbara Bui (@barbarabuiofficial)

Makeup and Hair: Nadia Kyrychenko (@makeup_paris_beauty)

Stylist: Viktor Kozak (@viktorkozaak)

Producer and Coordinator: Camille Blanchard

Model Agency: Modelagentgroup @soldatovanastya @modelagentgroup

Model from agency: Isabelle Tatevossian @isabelletatev

Independent model: Kristina Ustinovich @ustkris


Article by Camille Blanchard


Comments


bottom of page